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Wing Chun Wing Chun
Wing Chun Wing Chun

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WING CHUN CURRICULUM


1st Form: Sil Lim Tao * 2nd Form: Chum Kiu * 3rd Form: Biu Tze * 4th Form: Muk Jong – Wooden Dummy: 108 Techniques


Weapons:
1.    Long Pole
2.    Butterfly Swords
3.    Single & Double Daggers
4.    Double Stick Fighting
1.    Footwork
•    Yi Gi Kim Yeung Ma
•    Turning and Turn-shifting
•    Step Slide
•    Forward/Backward Bracing
•    Circle Up-step
•    Three-Angle Steping
•    Inside/Outside Facing
•    Turning 180?
8 Wing Chun Punche
•    Yi Gi Kim Yeung Ma
•    Turning and Turn-shifting
•    Step Slide
•    Forward/Backward Bracing
•    Circle Up-step
•    Three-Angle Steping
•    Inside/Outside Facing
•    Turning 180?

FOOTWORK

Yee Gee Kim Yeung Ma: “The Mother of All Wing Chun Stances”

•    Open your feet in two motions with feet together and fists chambered palm side up facing the chest and knees slightly bent:

1.    Spread your feet to a 45? angle (heels still together)
2.    Spread your heels outward so that your feet are turned slightly inward and roughly shoulder-width apart.

 

Turning and Turn-shifting

Turning:
•    From Yi Gee stance, pivot on your ankles left to right (and vice-versa).
•    Make sure to pivot on the heels of your feet.
•    Keep your body straight, along the centerline, and keep your head steady.

Turn-shifting:
•    Same as turning, except that you should shift your body from side to side, off the centerline, keeping most of your weight on the back leg.
•    Note: turn-shifting can be applied with dodging a punch while simultaneously counter-punching.

 

Step Slide

•    From the Yi Gee stance, one foot should be almost a step ahead of the other.
•    With your weight on your back foot, move the leading foot forward and push your body forward with your back foot.  As soon as your leading foot lands, slide your back foot forward into position.
•    Keep the body slightly angled and the feet on the same line.  Your hands should be always guarding the centerline.  Try to move quickly, but be steady so that your head and body will not move up and down.  A steady movement will create the illusion that you are not moving and will not make it obvious to your opponent that you are moving in to attack.
•    In reverse, move your back foot first, push your weight backward using your front foot, and then slide your front foot into position.

 

Forward/Backward Bracing

•    From the Yi Gee stance, lead with one leg stepping forward, then follow with the back leg.  Bracing is essentially walking (i.e. putting one foot in front of the other)
•    Reverse is essentially walking backwards.
•    Note: Make sure that each foot travels along a straight line forward and backward.

 

Circle Up-step

•    From YGKYM, move one foot forward, circling inside-out

 

Three-Angle Step

•    Combination of Circle Up-step and step-slide (used to attack or redirect from the outside to inside

 


WING CHIN BLOCKS

Bun Sao - Wing Arm Block

The Bung Sao (Wing Arm) uses the little finger side of the arm to deflect your opponents strike with the palm facing the opponent and the fingers held relaxed in line with the center of the body. The elbow forms a 135 degree angle with the wrist lower than the elbow and the elbow higher than the shoulder (depending on the height of your opponent). The thumb is held loose in this block which ensures that the strength is on the little finger side of the arm to correctly deflect the incoming strike.

 

Fok Sao

Rotating the arm upward, like a knife.
Drill: knock the punch upward at, or just behind, the elbow

 

Fuk (Fook) Sao - Controlling Arm

•    From the Yi Gee stance, one foot should be almost a step ahead of the other.
•    With your weight on your back foot, move the leading foot forward and push your body forward with your back foot.  As soon as your leading foot lands, slide your back foot forward into position.
•    Keep the body slightly angled and the feet on the same line.  Your hands should be always guarding the centerline.  Try to move quickly, but be steady so that your head and body will not move up and down.  A steady movement will create the illusion that you are not moving and will not make it obvious to your opponent that you are moving in to attack.
•    In reverse, move your back foot first, push your weight backward using your front foot, and then slide your front foot into position.

 

Garn Sao – Blocking with the palm, but similar to Bun Sao 

Extend the arm outward, and circle it over your opponent’s punch, moving it out of the way and opening him up for a strike.

 

Gum Sao – Blocks down

Contacting with the outside of the forearm or palm, from the same side; similar to Fok Sao, but lower and to the side.

 

Huen Sao

Like a reverse Fuk Sao, but also hooking
Roll the wrist over your opponent’s and rotate it to the outside.

 

Jung Sao – Blocks upward

Contacting with the inside forearm, from side to side.

 

Jut Sao – Blocks down

Contacting with the palm

 

Lap Sao – “Pulling Hand.”  

The Lap Sao is used to pull one arm of your opponent and making him off balance whilst simultaneously striking him with your other hand for example after a Tan Sao block you maintain contact with your opponents striking arm and you rotate your wrist into a Lap Sao and pull him forward onto a strike with your other hand.

 

Pak Sao – “Slapping Hand.”

This is a very effective block similar to a parry used in boxing where the hand is used to slap away your opponents strike to your head. The key to using the Pak Sao is to use it efficiently by ensuring that you only move your hand the minimum amount so that you slap your opponents punch just enough so that it misses you, if you Pak Sao too far then you run the risk of being trapped by your opponent should he pull your Pak Sao down and trap your other arm with it enabling him a free shot at you.

 

Tan Sao - Palm Up Block

A Palm up block where the palm of the hand is straight and the fingers are held together with the thumb cocked in and held against the top side of the hand. By holding the thumb in there is a natural tension gained that helps to catch an opponent's incoming power, if you do not hold in your thumb then you risk the block being weak and unable to deflect your opponents strike.